Super Human Growth Hormone

enjoy your life with super hgh

Archive for August 20th, 2009

Growth Hormones in Food

Author: Super Human Growth Hormone
08 20th, 2009

Meat and dairy products form the basis of many Western diets. In fact, the popular perception is that a portion of meat and two glasses of milk every day will ensure good bones and muscle mass. However, many people are unaware of what actually goes into the cartons of milk they get from the local supermarket, or the cuts of beef they grill on the barbecue.

The ugly fact of dairy and meat (especially beef) production is that many large producers are extensively using growth hormones to boost production. This is not a new issue, bovine growth hormones, used in the US to boost beef and milk production, have been the focus of debate for some time now. But although growing numbers of consumers and scientists have expressed concerns about potential human health risks of this practice, the USDA and FDA have approved the use of six hormone growth promotants (HGPs) in the cultivation of beef cattle, and one more hormone used to increase milk productivity. Only a few other countries have approved the use of HGPs, while many others have banned their use.

Controversy also surrounds the fact that there are no labeling requirements in the U.S. for growth hormones in food. A recent study making a strong environmental case for the controversial cattle injections, has added a new twist to the debate. The growth hormone debate is centred around four main issues: who benefits from these growth hormones; animal health and welfare; food safety and environmental concerns.

The History of Artificial Growth Hormones 

Growth hormones in milk 

Bovine somatotropin or BST is a hormone naturally secreted by the pituitary glands of cows. Traces of BST are found in the milk secreted by the hormone injected animal. BST is also poularly known as BGH, or bovine growth hormone. It interacts with other hormones in cows’ bodies to control the amount of milk they produce.

Scientists working for Monsanto, the agricultural giant, developed a genetically-engineered synthetic version of the hormone called recombinant bovine growth hormone or rBGH, that increased milk production by 10% to 25%. Approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1993, it was offered to interested farmers the next year. By 2008, a third of American dairy cows were being injected with rBGH.

Growth hormones in beef 

The US cattle industry started using hormones to enhance beef produciton in 1956. They used DES (diethylstilbestrol) – which had been approved for use in beef cattle in 1954. In the 1970s, US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved six hormone growth promotants (HGPs). These included three naturally occurring hormones – Oestradiol, Progesterone and Testosterone – and three synthetically prepared hormones – Zeranol, Trenbolone, and Melengestrol.

Growth hormones in veal 

In 2004, the US veal industry was found guilty of injecting 90% of its calves with growth hormones. These hormones included all six HGPs approved for use in adult cattle only, bringing into focus the safety or side effects of injecting calves with hormones intended for heifers and steers over 700 lbs, a fact that has never been evaluated. It is suspected that these hormones may be metabolized differently in the young calf’s body which could lead to greater amounts of hormones consumed by people who eat veal.

 

Human Growth Hormone boosts the functions of all your organs keeping you young.